Frequently Asked Questions

Here is a list of frequently asked questions (FAQs) about Extreme Love Ministries. If you don’t find an answer to your question in this list, please feel free to submit one in the form at the bottom of the page. This list will grow over time in response to some of the questions we receive.

Are my contributions tax-deductible?
Where is ELM located?
Can I visit and participate in ministry efforts in these places?
I care deeply about women and children trapped in brothels, and I’ve seen documentaries of how trained teams conduct raids to free them. I have some military (or other) training, so can I join your raid team so that I can help free more?
Does ELM accept short-term volunteers?
Does ELM offer paid positions?
I’d like to purchase products that will also help ELM and those who benefit from the ministry’s activities. Do you have a website that offers that?
Do you offer sponsorships for children?
Do you have current pressing needs?
How has the Covid-19 pandemic affected ELM’s work?
Do you work with men also?
Do you receive government grants or other public financial assistance?
How do people become victims of human trafficking?

Q:   Are my contributions tax-deductible?
A:  ELM is a U.S. registered 501(c)(3) charity, which means that yes, donations are tax deductible for U.S. taxpayers (if you receive a product or service from ELM in exchange for a donation, the value of such will be subtracted from the total amount, leaving a balance that qualifies for a charity donation that can be deducted. Similar laws apply for Canadian donations.

Q:    Where is ELM located?
A:    ELM administrative offices are located in Maricopa, Arizona, but the director of the organization and ministry operations are based in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Work also takes place in Iraq and Vietnam, and is expected to grow into neighboring countries in Southeast Asia as God provides opportunities.

Q:    Can I visit and participate in ministry efforts in these places?
A:    Currently ELM organizes and/or facilitates teams from other nations for short vision trips to witness and participate in some aspects of ELM’s ministry in Cambodia (trips are not currently offered to countries other than Cambodia). To protect rescued victims from re-exploitation, however, some restrictions are necessary but sometimes vary based on team size and makeup. Click here to learn more.

Q:    I care deeply about women and children trapped in brothels, and I’ve seen documentaries of how trained teams conduct raids to free them. I have some military (or other) training, so can I join your raid team so that I can help free more?
A:    The practice of raiding brothels to rescue women and children is largely a thing of the past due to heightened security issues (organized crime has gained a stronger foothold in recent years), making this “frontal assault” technique more dangerous. In addition, the long-term effectiveness of this method has come into doubt, because without a robust infrastructure of aftercare, skills training, and a change of entrenched cultural values and thinking, victims are too easily exploited again. Also, many such brothels would just reopen soon afterwards with a fresh group of victims and with a more “underground” profile to avoid detection. Instead, we believe that long-term relationship building is the key to all truly effective prevention, rescue, and restoration activities.

Q:    Does ELM accept short-term volunteers?
A:    Yes, provided they successfully complete our application process and a place of ministry is determined. Click here for more information.

Q:    Does ELM offer paid positions?
A:    Yes, from time-to-time full- and parttime paid staff positions become available. Click here for more information.

Q:    I’d like to purchase products that will also help ELM and those who benefit from the ministry’s activities. Do you have a website that offers that?
A:    Yes, Everlasting Love is a ministry arm of ELM that trains women who were formerly trafficked or in prostitution to create high-end jewelry, clothing and accessories. Proceeds from sales provide income for the women, and also help sustain other ministries at ELM. Click here to visit our store!

Q:    Do you offer sponsorships for children?
A:    Yes, we offer educational sponsorships that provide for the education of at-risk children living in Phnom Penh slums who might otherwise not be able to attend school. Sponsorship pays for incidental school fees, uniforms, shoes, backpacks, school supplies, and special events and programs for children organized by ELM. We also offer lunch sponsorships, which pay for student lunches. These programs also provide opportunities to reach kids with the gospel and disciple them. Click here to learn more.

Q:    Do you have current pressing needs?
A:    Yes, click here to see a range of needs that are not fully funded.

Q:    How has the Covid-19 pandemic affected ELM’s work?
A:    The challenges have been many, such as how to help children continue to learn while schools are closed for long periods (remote learning is not a viable option for most), but God has used this time of crisis to open many doors of ministry, for which we are thankful. The greatest challenge is the restriction on travel, which has kept our director, Andrea, from making important relationship-building and organizational meetings in the U.S., prevented teams from visiting Cambodia, and hampered our efforts to expand work in Iraq and Vietnam.

Q:    Do you work with men also?
A:    Yes, men are also at risk of being trafficked, primarily into dangerous labor jobs. Whenever we encounter men in vulnerable circumstances (physically, emotionally, spiritually, or economically), we try to help them get to a place of safety, especially if they have families who depend on them.

Q:    Do you receive government grants or other public financial assistance?
A:    No, ELM is a faith-based 501(c)(3) charity that relies fully on partners who share our vision, see our work, and want to participate in the joyful process of bringing God’s redemptive love into the neediest places. We do that by focusing on the lives of the “least of these” (see Matthew 25) who are vulnerable, currently in situations of abuse or exploitation, or recovering from the traumas they experienced as a result of being trafficked.

Q:    How do people become victims of human trafficking?
A:    In most cases, women and children (and men) who become victims of human trafficking do so during a time of great vulnerability. This made them easy targets for those who seek to exploit others for their own greed or pleasure. The most common characteristics of the vulnerable are extreme poverty (either chronic poverty, or that which results suddenly from a natural or manmade disaster), ignorance (lacking formal education, or unaware of the schemes of evil people), or being in a place of real or perceived desperation. Many are deceived by false promises, such as for a good job or fame, but many do so willingly due to extreme cultural pressures (support the family) or false hope in a better future via the path of great sacrifice, such as someone who willingly enters prostitution. (Click here to learn more.)

 

 

 

 

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